Attribution Discovery & Secrets To Scaling Your Digital Marketing with Vanessa Branco

Attribution & Secrets To Scaling with Vanessa Branco

As the digital advertising landscape continues to evolve, understanding the impact and effectiveness of advertising efforts is crucial for businesses looking to optimize their marketing strategies. In a recent episode of the Forbes podcast, digital marketing expert Vanessa Branco shares her insights on the power of advertising attribution and how it can significantly impact a company’s return on investment (ROI).

With over 15 years of experience working with startups, Fortune 100 companies, and publicly traded companies, Vanessa Branco is a seasoned professional in digital branding and marketing, media optimization, performance-based marketing, and customer retention. She currently serves as the Vice President of Business Development for a white label trading desk and runs her own digital consultancy, VersaNine, providing hands-on expertise to brands looking to in-house their media buying.

During the podcast episode, Branco shares her journey in the digital advertising industry, starting as an Advertising Manager for a publicly-traded company that was advertising in-house and operating sites including screensavers.com. She highlights the evolution of advertising methods and priorities, which have remained consistent in acquiring customers, driving revenue, and increasing ROI, but have diversified in their approach.

Branco emphasizes the importance of attribution in digital advertising, citing her experience at screensavers.com where manual reporting and a constant need to acquire new customers led her to start slow and gradually adopt attribution. She also reminisces about the early days of affiliate networks, pixels, and the “Halo effect” – a term used to describe the positive impact of digital advertising on other marketing channels.

Attribution Discovery & Secrets To Scaling Your Digital Marketing with Vanessa Branco

Branco shares anecdotes from her experience in the industry, including her early efforts to prove that display advertising worked during the MySpace era, and the challenges of over-counting and inaccurate reporting. She highlights the game-changing impact of attribution in providing accurate insights into the performance of different creatives, affiliate programs, search terms, and vendors. By leveraging attribution, Branco explains how budget allocation can be optimized based on data-driven decision making.

One of the key takeaways from Branco’s insights is the importance of moving slowly and getting buy-in from stakeholders when implementing attribution. She emphasizes that it takes time, usually 3 to 6 months, to fully understand and leverage the power of attribution in a company’s marketing efforts.

Branco also shares how attribution can go beyond just tracking performance metrics, but also provide insights into the “why” behind a customer’s decision-making process, which can be invaluable for future campaigns. She advises on the optimal number of creatives to test simultaneously and provides recommendations on how long to test creatives for optimal results.

In conclusion, Branco’s expertise in advertising attribution shines through in this insightful podcast episode. Her experiences and anecdotes highlight the game-changing impact of attribution in digital advertising, providing businesses with data-driven insights to optimize their marketing strategies and improve ROI. As the digital landscape continues to evolve, leveraging attribution should be a priority for businesses looking to stay competitive and drive results in their advertising efforts.

Math The Frontier of Attribution with Havas Helia’s President Michael Kaushansky

Math: The Frontier of Attribution with Michael Kaushansky

In today’s rapidly evolving digital marketing landscape, the importance of accurate measurement and attribution cannot be overstated. Understanding the impact of marketing efforts on consumer behavior and sales is crucial for businesses to optimize their strategies and stay competitive in the marketplace. One of the leading experts in this field is Michael Kaushansky, former Chief Data Officer and President of Havas Helia and currently on the Decision Science team at Walmart Connect.  In a podcast interview, Michael shared his journey in the world of data analytics and measurement, and his vision for the future of attribution.

Michael’s career trajectory in measurement began with his passion for mathematics. With a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and a master’s in applied mathematics and operational research, he started his career at GE, Target, and GlaxoSmithKline, where he honed his skills in data analytics and business measurement. His breakthrough in digital advertising came after the 2008 financial crisis, when he realized the potential of data sets available on the World Wide Web for tracking ads, searches, and consumer behaviors.

In the podcast interview, Michael shared how he and his team of mathematicians at Havas Helia built what is now known as the path to purchase tracking. This innovative approach enables businesses to credit their marketing activities with their success rates in moving consumers through the sales funnel. By accurately attributing the impact of different marketing touchpoints, businesses can better allocate their budgets, make informed decisions in real-time, and optimize their marketing strategies.

Michael also discussed the importance of adapting to the digital world, where consumers are spending more and more time on their devices, even for brick-and-mortar purchases. Attribution in the digital space becomes imperative for businesses to understand the effectiveness of their offline marketing efforts and make data-driven decisions.

Math The Frontier of Attribution with Havas Helia’s President Michael Kaushansky

Despite the increasing importance of attribution in digital marketing, Michael highlighted three main barriers to adoption. First, the complexity of advanced analytics and attribution can be daunting for businesses that are not familiar with the intricacies of data analysis. Second, the lack of awareness and education about the benefits of attribution can hinder adoption. Lastly, the fear of failure and resistance to change can hold businesses back from embracing new measurement practices.

To overcome these barriers, Michael emphasized the need for businesses to be proactive in adopting advanced analytics and attribution. He encouraged advertisers and agencies to ask for sample data sets and test different attribution models to understand their effectiveness in their specific business contexts. He also highlighted the increasing adoption of attribution by big players in the industry and the progression of adoption typically seen for new practices.

Kaushansky is a pioneer in the field of digital marketing measurement. His expertise in data analytics and attribution has helped businesses optimize their marketing strategies and achieve better results. As the digital landscape continues to evolve, attribution will become even more critical for businesses to understand the impact of their marketing efforts and make data-driven decisions. Adapting to the digital world and embracing advanced analytics and attribution will be key for businesses to remain competitive in today’s dynamic marketing environment.

Attribution Adoptions Organizational Challenge with Kevin Seaman

Attribution Adoption’s Organizational Challenge with Kevin Seaman

Transforming from a TV-centric advertiser to a digital marketing powerhouse may seem like a daunting task, but Kevin Seaman, the Founder of Results Analytics and the VP of Performance Marketing at UAGC has done just that. In a podcast interview, Seaman shares his story of how he took a TV-centric organization and moved it into the digital space using cross-channel multi-touch attribution.

Seaman’s journey began in 2013 when he was working at Southern New-Hampshire University (SNHU). SNHU was looking to build its brand and drive growth in the online space on a national scale, but was exclusively spending on TV advertising. In order to convince decision-makers to fund a more diversified marketing mix, Seaman had to prove that digital was working. He ran numerous pilots in the digital space, testing different strategies and measuring their impact.

One of the challenges Seaman faced was the reliance on view-through measurement, which he refers to as the “blimp measurement.” He explains that this data point has shortcomings and unreliability, leading him to do large-scale placebo testing to identify a more reliable solution. He eventually convinced his marketing team to fund digital multi-channel, multi-touch attribution, a major milestone in his attribution journey.

Throughout his time at SNHU, Seaman constantly gathered proof of the success of his attribution strategy. He shares that getting people to adopt a new technology and move budget line items was the hardest part of the process. He faced organizational challenges and provides tips on how to overcome them, emphasizing the importance of organizational buy-in and communication.

Seaman also discusses the role of creative in attribution, highlighting the need for a balance between math and soft skills. He shares that in an organization, math alone will not sell attribution, and a different set of skills is required. He uses the example of Google to illustrate this point.

Attribution Adoptions Organizational Challenge with Kevin Seaman

Looking towards the future of attribution, Seaman discusses the non-measurable aspects of attribution, the possible fragmentation of attribution, and the impact of growing privacy concerns and vendor relationships. He also shares his insight that the people part of attribution is more difficult than the math, emphasizing the importance of human factors in implementing and optimizing attribution strategies.

Seaman’s story is one of transformation and success in the digital marketing space. Through his experience at SNHU, he navigated the challenges of adopting cross-channel multi-touch attribution and achieved significant results. His journey serves as a valuable lesson for marketers looking to transition from traditional advertising methods to a more data-driven, digital approach. As attribution continues to evolve and become more complex, Seaman’s insights on organizational buy-in, the role of creative, and the human factors involved in attribution are invaluable for marketers seeking to maximize outcomes and make analytics part of their DNA.

Overall, Kevin Seaman’s story is a testament to the power of data-driven marketing and the importance of constantly evolving strategies to adapt to the digital landscape. His achievements at SNHU demonstrate that with the right approach, it is possible to successfully transition from TV-centric advertising to a digital marketing powerhouse. As attribution continues to play a crucial role in marketing strategies, Seaman’s insights and experiences provide valuable lessons for marketers looking to drive growth and maximize outcomes in the ever-changing world of digital marketing.

Attribution & Viewability with GrocerKey’s Head of Digital Marketing David Kaplan

AI-Driven Attribution with David Kaplan

Digital marketing has revolutionized the way businesses acquire customers, but it also comes with its own set of challenges. Viewability and attribution, in particular, have been major barriers for marketers seeking to optimize their strategies and measure their success accurately. In a recent interview David Kaplan, Head of Digital Marketing at GrocerKey, shared his insights and experiences on how he overcame these challenges and achieved success in the ever-evolving landscape of digital marketing.

David Kaplan’s career in digital marketing started as a self-taught developer for the Tribune Company’s joint venture with America Online in the early nineties. He then went on to work on some of the earliest sports websites, including Shaq.com and the San Francisco 49ers, as the Director of Special Projects for SportsLine. As digital continued to grow, Kaplan built out affiliate, paid search, and SEO programs for TicketsNow and Discover Financial. In 2009, he took on all digital media responsibilities for Peapod, where he faced the challenges of viewability and attribution head-on.

One of the challenges Kaplan encountered was Google Analytics taking credit for conversions that were not directly attributable to the ads, resulting in inaccurate measurement of campaign performance. He also faced issues with duplicates and customer blindness, where customers were resistant to ads due to the overwhelming number of ads they were exposed to. Kaplan knew he needed a solution that could provide accurate attribution and viewability data to optimize his marketing efforts.

Kaplan identified viewability as a priority when searching for an attribution partner. He understood the importance of knowing whether his ads were actually being seen by users and wanted a solution that could provide reliable viewability data. He also recognized the increasing competitiveness of the marketing environment, with rising cost of acquisition, and the need to understand how his marketing budget was being utilized effectively.

Attribution & Viewability with GrocerKey’s Head of Digital Marketing David Kaplan

Kaplan’s “aha” moment came when he discovered the power of attribution in digital marketing. He realized that by using a multi-touch attribution approach, he could accurately measure the impact of each touchpoint in the customer journey and optimize his marketing strategies accordingly. However, getting buy-in from stakeholders and convincing them to believe in the numbers was not easy. Kaplan had to focus on data warehouse matching and education about the multi-touch attribution process to build trust and get Peapod to adopt this new technology.

Kaplan also emphasized the importance of the first touch in customer acquisition, especially in non-brand search. He explained that understanding the initial touchpoint in the customer journey is crucial as it sets the foundation for subsequent interactions and influences the customer’s decision-making process.

Looking ahead, Kaplan predicts that in the next 10 years, anyone who is serious about digital marketing and can afford it will be implementing attribution in their strategies. He believes that attribution will become a standard practice in the industry as marketers seek to optimize their campaigns and measure their success accurately.

Kaplan’s journey in digital marketing is a testament to the challenges and opportunities that come with the evolving landscape of the industry. By overcoming the hurdles of viewability and attribution, Kaplan has been able to optimize his marketing strategies and achieve success in customer acquisition. His insights and experiences serve as valuable lessons for marketers navigating the digital marketing landscape in today’s competitive environment. As the industry continues to evolve, attribution is poised to become a standard practice for serious marketers who want to stay ahead of the game.

Attribution Training with Leslie Laredo

Attribution Training with Leslie Laredo

Digital marketing is a rapidly evolving field that requires marketers to stay updated with the latest trends, technologies, and strategies in order to succeed. One key aspect of staying ahead in the game is investing in training, as highlighted by Leslie Laredo, a digital marketing trainer with over 25 years of experience in the industry. In a recent podcast interview, Leslie shared her thoughts on how companies can increase their revenue by prioritizing training for their marketing teams.

Leslie Laredo has trained over a hundred thousand marketing professionals over the last two decades, and she believes that the biggest challenge to multi-touch attribution, a critical aspect of digital marketing, is the refusal to challenge assumptions. According to Leslie, challenging assumptions and constantly upgrading knowledge and skills through training are essential to excel in today’s fast-paced marketing world.

One of the key differences that Leslie highlighted between successful marketing teams and those that struggle is the presence of a learning culture and commitment to training. Companies that prioritize training create teams that excel and are able to challenge assumptions about their business and the marketplace. Leslie shared an anecdote from an NAA (Newspaper Association of America) conference where she encountered proud members of the “dead tree society,” referring to those who were resistant to embracing digital media and its potential.

Leslie emphasized three important aspects of training that she focuses on with her clients: the WHY, HOW, and WHAT. Understanding why certain marketing strategies are important, how they work, and what tools are available to implement them is crucial for marketing professionals to make informed decisions and drive results. Leslie also discussed the evolving landscape of attribution, which has gained prominence in recent years, and how it can help in better decision-making by telling a story of data-driven insights.

Attribution Training with Leslie Laredo

She pointed out that institutionalized metrics often create a grey area, where it becomes unclear whose responsibility it is to flag them and implement better measurement practices. Leslie believes that the solution lies in making attribution a ubiquitous part of marketing decisions, using it as a tool to change outcomes and continuously improve performance.

Leslie also emphasized the need for a culture of learning and training in the digital marketing world. She cited the example of Outbrain, a content discovery platform, which dedicates one hour per week for training sessions and encourages employees to share their knowledge. Leslie believes that a training cadence should not be limited to a schedule or budget, but should be ingrained in the company or department culture to foster continuous learning and improvement.

Furthermore, Leslie highlighted that the digital marketing field is constantly evolving, and employees need to be equipped with the right knowledge and skills to keep up with the changes. She emphasized that investing in education and training is essential, and companies should not wait until something goes wrong to try and improve their processes. Learning to fail fast and adapt quickly to changes is crucial in the dynamic digital marketing landscape.

In conclusion, Leslie Laredo’s insights on the importance of training in digital marketing are invaluable. She emphasizes that challenging assumptions, investing in a learning culture, and continuously upgrading knowledge and skills through training are essential for marketing professionals to stay ahead and succeed in today’s competitive landscape. Companies that prioritize training for their marketing teams are likely to see increased revenue and better decision-making, as employees are equipped with the right tools and knowledge to drive results. In the fast-paced world of digital marketing, training is not just an option, but a necessity for staying ahead of the game.

Walled Gardens & Attribution Truths With Crossmedia Lee Beale

Walled Gardens & Attribution Truths With Crossmedia’s Lee Beale

This interview with Lee Beale, head of Redbox at Xmedia, on “This is Attribution” covers his transition from brand management to leading a media analytics division. Beale discusses the challenges in advertising attribution, the limitations of last-click models, and the importance of multi-touch attribution in understanding the consumer journey. He emphasizes the need for truth in marketing data and predicts future advancements in attribution methods driven by AI and machine learning. The interview offers insights into the evolving landscape of media analytics and its strategic impact.

In the world of marketing, data analytics has become a game-changer. Marketers are constantly striving to make the right decisions with their budgets and build their businesses effectively. One industry expert who has honed his skills in data analytics and has valuable insights to share is Lee Beale, the guru behind Crossmedia’s Red Box data analytics practice. With a successful career that spans from managing consumer packaged goods (CPG) brands to being recognized as a media all-star by AdWeek, Lee Beale’s expertise is highly sought after in the marketing world.

Lee Beale’s journey in the marketing industry started in the UK, where he managed CPG brands for Reckitt Benckiser and GSK. In 2009, he moved to New York to join Omnicom Media Group’s Analect data science division, where he further honed his skills in data analytics. Since joining Crossmedia in 2011, Lee has been a driving force behind the development of Red Box, which has become a world-class offering that Crossmedia places at the center of its media planning and buying approach.

One of Beale’s key insights is the importance of seeking truth in the midst of marketing noise. In an interview, he shared that his biggest task is to ensure a smooth and long-term operation for both the agency and the client. He breaks down the various moving parts involved in this process, highlighting the need for accurate attribution and actionable business intelligence.

Lee also understands the challenges of getting buy-in for attribution. He acknowledges that there is resistance from some stakeholders, and he uses tactics to melt the cold attribution heart. He emphasizes the importance of educating and communicating the value of attribution to stakeholders, showcasing how it can significantly impact marketing decisions and ultimately drive business results.

Walled Gardens & Attribution Truths With Crossmedia Lee Beale

One of Lee’s notable insights is the potential cost of working with last-click attribution alone. He reveals that many brands overspend significantly when they leave out multitouch offline data, and the amount is much higher than expected. This highlights the importance of incorporating a comprehensive approach to attribution, considering all touchpoints in the customer journey to accurately allocate marketing budgets and maximize ROI.

Lee also shares his experiences with social media vendors who challenge his methodology and the impact of multi-touch attribution on advertising fundamentals, including branding. He emphasizes the need to manage expectations with stakeholders and highlights this as one of the biggest lessons he has learned while working in the attribution space.

Looking ahead, Beale predicts significant advancements in attribution modeling, driven by AI and machine learning. These technologies, according to him, will revolutionize how marketers understand consumer behavior and campaign effectiveness.  He encourages marketers to rethink their channels and constantly adapt to changing consumer behaviors and technology advancements.

Under Beale’s leadership, Redbox has successfully integrated these principles into Crossmedia’s strategies, enhancing client campaigns with more accurate and actionable insights. His vision represents not just a shift in analytics but a transformation in how marketing strategies are conceived and executed.

From seeking truth in marketing noise to managing expectations with stakeholders, his insights can help marketers make informed decisions with their budgets and build their businesses effectively. As the industry continues to evolve, Beale’s expertise will undoubtedly be a valuable asset for marketers looking to navigate the complex world of data analytics and attribution.

Attribution Is A Team Sport With Ted Moon

Attribution Is A Team Sport With Ted Moon

As the digital marketing landscape continues to evolve at a rapid pace, the importance of attribution and outcome measurement cannot be overstated. Ted Moon, the founder of Pathfinder Interactive, a leading digital marketing agency, understands this better than most. With nearly two decades of experience in the industry, Ted has built and overseen multimillion-dollar online media budgets for major brands such as Nextel, Sprint Nextel, and Capital One, and has consistently delivered record-breaking campaigns by leveraging cutting-edge digital techniques while staying grounded in traditional marketing principles.

In a recent podcast interview, Ted shares his insights and expertise on the role of attribution in today’s media environment, along with his personal journey and lessons learned along the way. He emphasizes the need for marketers to move beyond the conventional playbook and embrace innovative approaches to stay ahead in the ever-changing digital landscape.

One of the key takeaways from Ted’s interview is the shift from a consulting perspective to a partnering relationship with clients on their day-to-day operations. He explains that the innovations of the past have become part of the everyday playbook for marketers, and the focus now is on partnering with clients to implement and optimize strategies that align with their business goals. This approach allows for more agility and adaptability in the fast-paced world of digital marketing.

Drawing from his experience as a lacrosse coach, Ted also emphasizes the importance of teamwork in marketing and measurement. He highlights the role of attribution in aligning different marketing channels and tactics towards a common goal, rather than looking at them in isolation. He cautions against relying solely on the highest-scoring medium or channel, as it may lead to poor decision-making in terms of budget allocation. Instead, Ted advocates for a holistic approach that considers the entire customer journey and the contribution of each touchpoint towards the desired outcome.

Attribution Is A Team Sport With Ted Moon

However, Ted acknowledges that not all marketers are fully leveraging the power of attribution. He identifies three main barriers: lack of awareness, inadequate budget allocation, and internal politics. To overcome these challenges, Ted suggests a minimal proportional budget structure for attribution and underscores the importance of having the necessary intel to make informed decisions about resource allocation.

Furthermore, Ted believes that attribution is not limited to acquisition marketers with transactional KPIs but can also benefit brand marketers. By understanding the impact of different marketing efforts on brand perception and customer behavior, brand marketers can optimize their strategies and drive better results.

In conclusion, Ted Moon’s Pathfinder Interactive is at the forefront of driving innovation in digital marketing by unlocking the power of attribution. Ted’s expertise and insights provide valuable guidance for marketers navigating the complex and ever-changing media landscape. As the industry continues to evolve, embracing attribution and outcome measurement as essential components of marketing strategies will be crucial for staying competitive and driving meaningful results.

So, whether you are a seasoned marketer or just starting out in the field, Ted’s podcast interview is a must-listen. With his wealth of experience and deep understanding of attribution, Ted offers valuable insights that can help you unlock the full potential of your marketing efforts in today’s dynamic media environment.

Be sure to tune in to Ted Moon’s interview and stay ahead of the game in the fast-paced world of digital marketing. And as Ted would say, remember that attribution is a team goal, not just the responsibility of one player. So, embrace the power of attribution and drive success in your marketing strategies!

Suffolk University Partners with Boston Celtics, Hosts Hackathon with Provalytics CEO

Suffolk University’s Sawyer Business School recently announced a new partnership with the Boston Celtics, launching an interdisciplinary Sports Management program in Fall 2023.  As part of this collaboration, the university hosted a ‘hackathon’ event on March 3 during its annual Bridging the Gap Marketing Conference, powered by VistaPrint. Jeff Greenfield, CEO of Provalytics and a member of the Marketing Advisory Council for Suffolk University, participated as a judge in this event.

The hackathon was aimed at helping the Celtics grow awareness and increase the number of applicants for black and minority-owned businesses in New England. Participating students were tasked with forming teams to address this challenge, demonstrating the real-world application of sports business to solve pressing issues.

Greenfield played a pivotal role in the hackathon event by lending his expertise and providing valuable feedback to the participants. His involvement not only elevated the competition but also showcased the strength of the university’s relationships with industry leaders.

The partnership between Suffolk University and the Boston Celtics is designed to offer students unique learning opportunities, including yearly projects from the Celtics and regular visits from their executives and management. Ted Dalton, Chief Partnership Officer for the Boston Celtics, expressed enthusiasm for the collaboration, stating, “We’re honored to be able to team up with Suffolk University to support a comprehensive and contemporary program that helps develop the next generation of sports business leaders.”

The new Sports Management program, directed by marketing professor Skip Perham, brings together existing sports-related courses from both the School of Business and the College of Arts and Sciences. Students can now major or minor in the subject and gain a holistic understanding of the business side of sports.

Perham emphasized the value of the program’s location, citing its proximity to the TD Garden and Fenway Park, as well as the numerous sports corporations headquartered in Boston, such as New Balance and DraftKings. While internships are not guaranteed, students in the program will have a competitive advantage when applying for positions with these organizations, thanks to the strong relationship between the university and the Celtics.

Suffolk University’s partnership with the Boston Celtics marks a significant milestone as the first AACSB-accredited business school in Boston to offer a Sports Management program. Dean of the Sawyer Business School, Amy Zeng, highlighted the importance of this collaboration, stating that it “exemplifies how we utilize our distinctive downtown Boston location and our multidisciplinary programs to create transformational and immersive educational experiences.”

The successful hackathon event, featuring the participation of industry leaders like Jeff Greenfield, further cements Suffolk University’s commitment to providing its students with exceptional educational opportunities. As the university moves forward with its new Sports Management program, students can look forward to even more hands-on experiences, fostering the growth of future sports business leaders.

The Suffolk University Boston Celtics partnership is a collaboration between Suffolk University’s Sawyer Business School and the Boston Celtics NBA team. This partnership focuses on launching an interdisciplinary Sports Management program for students, offering unique learning opportunities, such as yearly projects from the Celtics, regular visits from Celtics executives, and access to industry leaders.

The Sports Management program at Suffolk University’s Sawyer Business School is set to begin in Fall 2023. It will offer both a major and minor in Sports Management, providing students with a holistic understanding of the business side of sports.

Suffolk University’s Sports Management program is unique due to its partnership with the Boston Celtics, its downtown Boston location, and its connections with various sports corporations headquartered in the city. Students in the program will have access to yearly projects from the Celtics, visits from their executives, and a competitive advantage when applying for internships with sports-related businesses in the area.

The hackathon event, held during the annual Bridging the Gap Marketing Conference at Suffolk University, was an initiative powered by VistaPrint and supported by the Boston Celtics. Students formed teams to address a challenge related to growing awareness and increasing the number of applicants for black and minority-owned businesses in New England. Jeff Greenfield, CEO of Provalytics and a member of the Marketing Advisory Council for Suffolk University, participated as a judge in the event, providing valuable insights and feedback to the participants.

How Should Brands Adapt During a Crisis? An interview with Bill Harvey

During times of crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, brands changed their messaging and advertising. Instead of avoiding coronavirus-related content, Bill Harvey, founder of Research Measurement Technologies, contends that brands could use the resonance score – the level of similarity between the RMT DriverTags in branding and content consumed by viewers – to create impactful ads. Brands can take advantage of the opportunity to introduce new uplifting and inspiring messaging, recognizing and honoring the work of frontline workers and heroes who played critical roles during the pandemic.

During uncertain times, marketers often face the temptation to cut marketing budgets. But according to Bill Harvey, a marketing analytics pioneer and CEO of Research Measurement Technologies (RMT), this could be a big mistake.

Bill Havey

Bill Harvey

In an interview with Jeff Greenfield, CEO of Provalytics, Harvey discussed the importance of marketing during times of contraction, emphasizing that brands should not pull back, but instead find new ways to connect with their audience.

One way brands can do this is through what Harvey calls “quality of life advertising.” Instead of focusing solely on product differences, brands should create inspiring, entertaining, useful, informative, educational, and uplifting messaging.

By doing so, they can bring value to consumers during difficult times and build brand loyalty. Harvey also emphasized the importance of understanding DriverTags.

 

Driver Tags

According to Harvey, RMT DriverTags are the scientifically proven behavior driving motivators which connect an ad and a brand to a person’s most important underlying subconscious motivations in life. They include emotional benefits, core values, mindsets, need states, character, and personality types. A DriverTag is an empirically derived variable identified by machine deep learning to cause behavioral change. There are 265 DriverTags.

For example, if a brand is promoting a new luxury car, the DriverTags might include the Motivations (macro clusters of DriverTags) Status/Prestige, Power, and Leadership. At a more nuanced level, an ad might include Need States (micro clusters of DriverTags) of Glamour and Perfectly Made. The more the DriverTags in an ad align with the audience’s interests and needs, the more effective the ad is likely to be. The same is true of the alignment between the DriverTags in the ad and the DriverTags in the media context (program, website, app, publication, etc.).

Harvey emphasizes that DriverTags were identified through data analysis, not mere creative intuition. By analyzing the performance of previous ads and identifying the key concepts that drove engagement, brands can hone in on their most effective DriverTags and use them to guide their marketing strategy.

Ultimately, the goal is to create ads that are as relevant and engaging as possible for the target audience, and that require a deep understanding of what drives their decision-making. By identifying and leveraging DriverTags, brands can increase their chances of resonating with their target audience and driving sales.

A recent analysis by the ARF Cognition Council found that Driver Tags explain 48% of sales.

Crisis Marketing

Harvey believes that there is an enormous opportunity for brands to connect with their audience during a crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Rather than immediately blocking their ads from coronavirus-related content, brands should find ways to pick up on the DriverTags in the content and create creative messaging that aligns with the current situation. This could include highlighting the heroes who are doing frontline research and caring for the ill, creating ads that inspire courage, and messaging that uplifts the spirits of those who are struggling.

Mind Magic

In addition to his expertise in marketing and media, Bill Harvey is also an author of a book titled “Mind Magic: Techniques for Transforming Your Life.”  The book is a compilation of techniques and mind tricks that Harvey has collected and refined throughout his life.

Harvey began working on the book in his thirties when his friends suggested that he should publish his collection of tricks that had been tested and proven to work.

The book is 12 chapters, each focusing on a specific trick, such as avoiding hasty closure, breaking assumptions, and changing perspective.

The techniques presented in the book are practical and can be applied to various aspects of one’s life, from improving decision-making to enhancing creativity.

The book has been well-received and has been used as a course text at universities such as NYU, UCLA, West Point, the Naval War College, and more.

Brand Marketing

Brands must be strategic and creative in how they adapt to the rapidly changing world during a crisis. According to Harvey, brands must use data to understand the consumer mindset and to ensure that the message is both relevant and resonant with the audience. By incorporating DriverTags, brands can drive home their message and create a more powerful impact.

Moreover, it is equally important for brands to understand the value of branded content that isn’t solely focused on selling a product. This strategy of quality-of-life advertising, as Harvey calls it, can be incredibly effective in communicating the brand’s values and creating an emotional connection with the audience. Finally, the importance of maintaining a consistent presence in the market, even during a crisis, cannot be overstated. Brands that pull back risk losing market share and their connection with the audience. Brands must rise to the challenge and adapt creatively to remain relevant and connected to consumers during a crisis.

 

Bill Harvey is a highly accomplished marketing and advertising research expert with over 50 years of experience in the industry. He is the co-founder and former Chairman of the Board of TRA, Inc., a consumer behavior data and analytics company. He is also the founder of his consulting firm, Bill Harvey Consulting, which advises clients on research and marketing strategies.

Throughout his career, Harvey has contributed significantly to the advertising industry, publishing numerous articles, white papers, and research studies on advertising and consumer behavior. He is also the author of several books, including “The Art of the Media Age,” “How to Prevent Your Advertising from Sucking,” and “Mind Magic,” which provides readers with 12 techniques for tapping into their creativity and problem-solving abilities.

Harvey has received numerous awards and recognition for his contributions to the industry, including the Media Research Council’s Lifetime Achievement Award and the American Association of Advertising Agencies’ (4A’s) highest honor, the Advertising Person of the Year Award. He has also been recognized as one of Advertising Age’s 100 most influential media professionals and is a frequent speaker at industry events and conferences. Harvey holds a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from Princeton University and a Master of Business Administration degree from Harvard Business School.

RMT DriverTags are the scientifically proven behavior driving motivators which connect an ad and a brand to a person’s most important underlying subconscious motivations in life. They include emotional benefits, core values, mindsets, need states, character, and personality types. A DriverTag is an empirically derived variable identified by machine deep learning to cause behavioral change. There are 265 DriverTags.

For example, if a brand is promoting a new luxury car, the DriverTags might include the Motivations (macro clusters of DriverTags) Status/Prestige, Power, and Leadership. At a more nuanced level, an ad might include Need States (micro clusters of DriverTags) of Glamour and Perfectly Made. The more the DriverTags in an ad align with the audience’s interests and needs, the more effective the ad is likely to be. The same is true of the alignment between the DriverTags in the ad and the DriverTags in the media context (program, website, app, publication, etc.).

Harvey emphasizes that DriverTags were identified through data analysis, not mere creative intuition. By analyzing the performance of previous ads and identifying the key concepts that drove engagement, brands can hone in on their most effective DriverTags and use them to guide their marketing strategy.

Ultimately, the goal is to create ads that are as relevant and engaging as possible for the target audience, and that require a deep understanding of what drives their decision-making. By identifying and leveraging DriverTags, brands can increase their chances of resonating with their target audience and driving sales.